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Not about Leo but since Leo is playing mostly in so called "oscar movies" I thought it's an interesting take. Also KOFTM will probably show if "post pandemic" Leo still has his box office power as the last movie star who can actually get adults to see adult dramas at the theater. And looking at the budget of this movie it has to make some money LOL

 

The “Oscar Movie” is Dying

Steven Spielberg’s “The Fabelmans” has bombed at the box-office. This coming after the filmmaker’s “West Side Story” garnered the same fate last year, which begs me to ask the question: if Spielberg can’t even bring people to a movie theatre anymore, then who can? I imagine Martin Scorsese, Wes Anderson, Christopher Nolan and Quentin Tarantino can still pull it off, but these four directors are now part of a dying breed.

What the post-pandemic theatrical era has done to adult dramas is absolutely brutal. There are so many factors that have contributed to the demise of critically-acclaimed films at the box office, one of which is older moviegoers learning how to stream and purchase films via the comfort of their own homes.

I’m still struck by how fast this change has happened. Movie theaters are turning primarily into, as Scorsese pointed out a few years back, theme park rides. What we’ve learned this year is that the younger crowd will still purchase a ticket for the token Marvel, Pixar, sequel packages, but that’s about it. You’ll have the odd “Elvis” phenomenon, but one look at this year’s 10 highest-grossing movies and they are all superhero movies and/or blockbuster sequels.

The result is a fall movie season that has manifested the total disinterest of mature moviegoers, who are now unwilling to watch any of the well-reviewed/Oscar contenders. The list keeps piling up: “Till” ($8.6 million total), “The Banshees of Inisherin” ($7.8 million), “TÁR” ($5.1 million), “She Said” ($4.2 million), “Triangle of Sadness” ($4 million), “Bones and All” ($3.7 million), “The Fabelmans” ($3.4 million), “Armageddon Time” ($1.8 million), “Aftersun” ($790,000).

It’s come to the point where a critically-acclaimed foreign film like “Decision to Leave,” which grossed just $1.7 million, becomes heralded as a resounding success.

It gets worse. One of the last remaining Oscar hopefuls, Damien Chazelle’s “Babylon,” is currently tracking at terrifyingly low numbers. The film is said to have a budget of around $90-100 million, and if it fails then this could be Chazelle’s “Heaven’s Gate” — a passion project that ultimately leads to a total revamping of the industry.

The hopeful one in me wants to believe that this has just been a weak year at the movies (it has) and that things will get back into place next year, but who am I kidding? Almost every single one of the above titles is now available to stream on VOD, not even a month after they were released. It’s now become a profitable business for studios. It’s sure as hell better than keeping these films in theaters where they would most likely go through a slow and gloomy death.

We’re now seeing a grim future for “cinema” at the movie theater. Prestige movies will remain, but in a different kind of form. We are about to enter the era of quality American moviemaking being driven by the likes of Apple, Netflix and Amazon. All of these streamers will continue producing top-notch content, screen them for a week in theaters (for the sake of Oscar eligibility) and then have them available in their platforms, for subscribers, a few weeks later.

As studios are hysterically looking for answers to these miserable numbers, the obvious has been right in front of them this entire time. During these last three years, the pandemic forced studios to stream much of their new content. Many moviegoers realized just how much more comfortable, and less headache-inducing, it was to stream at home than to go to the local cineplex. You can now just stay in, save money, and not endure any of the annoyances that come with watching a movie in public — who wants someone texting and talking right next to them during a movie?

It’s obvious, just looking at the ratings, that there’s an absolute disconnect between mainstream moviegoing and the Oscars. Despite critical acclaim and Oscar nominations, these films just aren’t that widely seen anymore. It used to be, at least in the ‘90s and ‘00s, that if you were a major Oscar contending movie then audiences would want to seek you out. Not anymore. Most of the country couldn’t care less about what critics or Oscar voters believe to be the worthiest achievements and it’s not going to get better, only worse.

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50 minutes ago, Jade Bahr said:

Not about Leo but since Leo is playing mostly in so called "oscar movies" I thought it's an interesting take. Also KOFTM will probably show if "post pandemic" Leo still has his box office power as the last movie star who can actually get adults to see adult dramas at the theater. And looking at the budget of this movie it has to make some money LOL

 

The “Oscar Movie” is Dying

Steven Spielberg’s “The Fabelmans” has bombed at the box-office. This coming after the filmmaker’s “West Side Story” garnered the same fate last year, which begs me to ask the question: if Spielberg can’t even bring people to a movie theatre anymore, then who can? I imagine Martin Scorsese, Wes Anderson, Christopher Nolan and Quentin Tarantino can still pull it off, but these four directors are now part of a dying breed.

What the post-pandemic theatrical era has done to adult dramas is absolutely brutal. There are so many factors that have contributed to the demise of critically-acclaimed films at the box office, one of which is older moviegoers learning how to stream and purchase films via the comfort of their own homes.

I’m still struck by how fast this change has happened. Movie theaters are turning primarily into, as Scorsese pointed out a few years back, theme park rides. What we’ve learned this year is that the younger crowd will still purchase a ticket for the token Marvel, Pixar, sequel packages, but that’s about it. You’ll have the odd “Elvis” phenomenon, but one look at this year’s 10 highest-grossing movies and they are all superhero movies and/or blockbuster sequels.

The result is a fall movie season that has manifested the total disinterest of mature moviegoers, who are now unwilling to watch any of the well-reviewed/Oscar contenders. The list keeps piling up: “Till” ($8.6 million total), “The Banshees of Inisherin” ($7.8 million), “TÁR” ($5.1 million), “She Said” ($4.2 million), “Triangle of Sadness” ($4 million), “Bones and All” ($3.7 million), “The Fabelmans” ($3.4 million), “Armageddon Time” ($1.8 million), “Aftersun” ($790,000).

It’s come to the point where a critically-acclaimed foreign film like “Decision to Leave,” which grossed just $1.7 million, becomes heralded as a resounding success.

It gets worse. One of the last remaining Oscar hopefuls, Damien Chazelle’s “Babylon,” is currently tracking at terrifyingly low numbers. The film is said to have a budget of around $90-100 million, and if it fails then this could be Chazelle’s “Heaven’s Gate” — a passion project that ultimately leads to a total revamping of the industry.

The hopeful one in me wants to believe that this has just been a weak year at the movies (it has) and that things will get back into place next year, but who am I kidding? Almost every single one of the above titles is now available to stream on VOD, not even a month after they were released. It’s now become a profitable business for studios. It’s sure as hell better than keeping these films in theaters where they would most likely go through a slow and gloomy death.

We’re now seeing a grim future for “cinema” at the movie theater. Prestige movies will remain, but in a different kind of form. We are about to enter the era of quality American moviemaking being driven by the likes of Apple, Netflix and Amazon. All of these streamers will continue producing top-notch content, screen them for a week in theaters (for the sake of Oscar eligibility) and then have them available in their platforms, for subscribers, a few weeks later.

As studios are hysterically looking for answers to these miserable numbers, the obvious has been right in front of them this entire time. During these last three years, the pandemic forced studios to stream much of their new content. Many moviegoers realized just how much more comfortable, and less headache-inducing, it was to stream at home than to go to the local cineplex. You can now just stay in, save money, and not endure any of the annoyances that come with watching a movie in public — who wants someone texting and talking right next to them during a movie?

It’s obvious, just looking at the ratings, that there’s an absolute disconnect between mainstream moviegoing and the Oscars. Despite critical acclaim and Oscar nominations, these films just aren’t that widely seen anymore. It used to be, at least in the ‘90s and ‘00s, that if you were a major Oscar contending movie then audiences would want to seek you out. Not anymore. Most of the country couldn’t care less about what critics or Oscar voters believe to be the worthiest achievements and it’s not going to get better, only worse.

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Sad but true😔

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This have nothing to do with Pandemic, it was happening before already, serious movies/dramas were not being seen at the theater, pandemic made it worse obviously but it started way before. It's the culture of super hero, franchises, prequels movies... that people want to watch repeteadly on the big screen even if this movies are mostly TRASH, this is more about the culture we are living at the moment. Of course the streaming is VERY comfortable and we certainly can find greats movies on it and they have the money to invest in it, but why only 1 week at theater? Why not 1 month at least? Well, probably because people will wait to watch at their coach at home... which for me is kinda sad. IF I lived closer to a cinema I would go every week, they can say movies at theaters are dying, BUT there is nothing like watching a movie in the big screen and sharing emotions with others together, it's something special that any movie at home CAN'T compare, never will. 

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Also no one cares for the oscars anymore. This show is just a joke. I think this has indeed something to do with the pandemic. People realized what's important to them (for sure not the oscars lol) and how fast you can loose it. So you focus more on the important things in life especially now where the memory of the pandemic is still fresh.

 

Personally I went A LOT more into cinema before the pandemic as I do these days. And I love cinema. I just don't like to sit between a sneezy folk anymore. Also most movies I saw at the cinema this year weren't really good. But maybe that was just my bad.

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I'm a rare kind of movie goer. I hold on to nostalgia and love going to the movies. It's basically what distracts me from real life. I really wanted to go watch the Fablemans but it wasn't playing in any of my two local theaters. I had to go to one that was a bit out of my way and didn't regret it at all. That is one beautiful movie- Spielberg absolutely killed it with that movie. I feel like people don't want real life stories anymore but I hope they don't stop making these movies. 

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3 hours ago, kellybsblover said:

I'm a rare kind of movie goer. I hold on to nostalgia and love going to the movies. It's basically what distracts me from real life. I really wanted to go watch the Fablemans but it wasn't playing in any of my two local theaters. I had to go to one that was a bit out of my way and didn't regret it at all. That is one beautiful movie- Spielberg absolutely killed it with that movie. I feel like people don't want real life stories anymore but I hope they don't stop making these movies. 

 

Cool to read this. 

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From NY Post article about Leo's visit to VIP Preview today at Art Basel Miami

 

Don't know where the pic with article is from 

 

The article does have pix of some of the art work Leo was checking out 

 

Quote

Leonardo DiCaprio eyes edgy works at Art Basel Miami Beach

 

Art Basel Miami Beach opened to VIPs on Tuesday, drawing in top collectors, artworld bigs, and Leonardo DiCaprio.

 

The star was spotted taking an interest in some edgy works, including a piece on Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, and a painting of what looked like a kinky alien lap dance.

 

DiCaprio was spotted in his signature black hat and mask checking out the fair at the Miami Convention Center for hours with two pals, and being led around by a seeming art advisor.

 

“You know how some people lower their glasses when they’re inspecting art,” mused a spy. “That’s what happens with Leo’s mask. It kept sliding down when he was looking at the work.”

 

DiCaprio was at the Rudolphe Jassen booth taking interest in a $35,000 painting by Patrizio di Massimo called “Untitled (Monsters),” featuring what looked like some sort of interspecies threesome.

 

The saucy painting depicts a man sitting on a chair being mounted by an orange monster while another blue monster stands behind him.

DiCaprio was even seen taking pics of the title card as well as getting a business card from the gallery.

 

The “Titanic” star — who reportedly already owns art by Egon Schiele, Pablo Picasso, and Takashi Murakami — was also seen staring intently for several minutes at a piece by Grayson Perry called “The American Dream,” which features a giant Mark Zuckerberg face, at the Paragon booth.

 

The $75,000 blue-and-red etching features the Meta mastermind’s head at the top of a map with faux locations like “the patriarchy,” “fake news” and “gender fluid.”

“He looked really interested in it,” says a spy. “The art advisor was pointing out things on the piece to him

 

https://pagesix.com/2022/11/29/leonardo-dicaprio-eyes-edgy-works-at-art-basel-miami-beach/

 

Leonardo-DiCaprio-Art-Basel-821.webp

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20 hours ago, kellybsblover said:

I'm a rare kind of movie goer. I hold on to nostalgia and love going to the movies. It's basically what distracts me from real life. I really wanted to go watch the Fablemans but it wasn't playing in any of my two local theaters. I had to go to one that was a bit out of my way and didn't regret it at all. That is one beautiful movie- Spielberg absolutely killed it with that movie. I feel like people don't want real life stories anymore but I hope they don't stop making these movies. 

Absolutely agree with you, the movie theater experience is magical and watching movies at home will never give you that

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