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Interesting watch:

 

 

Myth 3: Not saying the British Inquiry Report of 1912 was false but what on earth should've they said otherwise? Of course we locked up people below deck? LOL

 

Myth 4: Officer Murdoch. Well that's another story and maybe Cameron could have treaten that character differently BUT he apoligized by his family and in the end of the day it's not a documentary it's a hollywood movie. Despite from that personally I never had the feeling while watching the movie that Murdoch is a bad guy.

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20 hours ago, oxford25 said:

Sugarwater

 

Tks for informative reply :) 

 

Regarding the tribal dinners & ceremonial dinners = is there a particular reason why these activities take place in June ??

 

Also thanks for the explanation as to why they may have an owl appear in a scene 

 

I'm not sure if there is a particular reason why they take place in June. Most, but not all, dances/powwows occur in the summer. Probably, because people come from all over the country and some are coming back home to see family and since the kids are out of school, it makes it a better time to travel. June in Oklahoma is hot and humid, but July and August take hot and humid to another level. It's like being in a sauna on the surface of the sun. The Osage dances in Grayhorse are held outside, and wearing regalia is hot and stifling, so that may be why they are held in June instead of the later summer months.

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17 hours ago, Mirella said:

Can you please tell more about the tribal dinners and ceremonial dances? What do they celebrate? I hope they get an invitation or invite themselves if they can. It must be so much wisdom there. 

 

So, I'm going to start by telling about some of my personal history. My grandfather was one of the native children that were forced to leave their homes and attend US run boarding schools where they were abused and forcibly stripped of their language and culture. Because of this, a lot of language and culture has been lost to me, and I have been striving and working for many, many years to reclaim my heritage and culture. Living in the capitol of Cherokee Nation and working for Cherokee Nation has helped this quest tremendously. I have even been learning how to speak and write Cherokee for the past several years. It's a hard language to learn and there aren't many people to speak it with. 

 

As I mentioned in a previous post, when I started out on my PhD journey, it was due to a love of psychology as well as a program called American Indians into Psychology (AIIP).  This program helped PhD candidates such as myself, who are Native American, to be able to become psychologists and bring back our training and services to our Native American communities. I now mainly work with Native American children and their families (all tribes, not just Cherokee), who have suffered trauma.

 

Several years ago, a group of us who were just starting out in the AIIP program, were invited to several tribal celebrations of different tribes throughout the state of Oklahoma. Each tribe performed a blessing ceremony on us which was amazing and something I will never forget. We got to attend dinners, dances, sweat lodges, bon fires, etc.. As someone who had a lot (not all thank goodness) of thier culture stripped away, this tour of the nations was a life changing experience. At the Osage Nation, I got to celebrate with them during their June celebrations and attend the dinner and dances. I've been back a few times since then as well.

 

Dances/powwows are not a part of Cherokee culture. They never have been. Cherokee Nation does hold an intertribal powwow in September, where other tribes from all over the US come and dance. Dancing, however, is a big part of Osage culture. Watching them dance is inspiring and I always get chills. I have learned a little bit about their dances, but not much. I know they have three locations in Oklahoma where they dance. The dances occur over 12 days in June. Each location takes turns hosting the celebration for four days. Dinner is always served before hand as a way to nourish the communitiy's body and soul and create fellowship. Each of the Osage dances have particular meaning, and women are.only allowed to dance in a couple of them. I'm not familiar with anymore than that.

 

I know this was a lot more information than you asked for and are probably interested in knowing, but I didn't want to just say, "I don't really know." 😁 

 

 

 

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13 hours ago, Jade Bahr said:

Interesting watch:

 

 

Myth 3: Not saying the British Inquiry Report of 1912 was false but what on earth should've they said otherwise? Of course we locked up people below deck? LOL

 

Myth 4: Officer Murdoch. Well that's another story and maybe Cameron could have treaten that character differently BUT he apoligized by his family and in the end of the day it's not a documentary it's a hollywood movie. Despite from that personally I never had the feeling while watching the movie that Murdoch is a bad guy.

 

Thanks, Jade! That's very interesting.

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TODAY’S CASTING CALL 

 

June 12, 2021
 
Tap Dancers, 2-Steppers, Cloggers & Swing Dancers Needed for Major Feature Film

 

 
A major feature film, now shooting in Oklahoma, is looking for tap dancers, western swing dancers, cloggers and 2-steppers to appear in scenes later this month. Professional dance experience is not required. The film is looking for men and women 18-80 to fill these positions.
 
Those interested must be available June 19 for rehearsal and June 21 for filming. Possibly could be used June 22 and on future dates, based on availability,
 
Filming will be in the Pawhuska, and/or Fairfax, OK area.
 
The persons selected would need to attend a costume fitting in Bartlesville, OK, sometime during the week of June 14-18.
 
Pay for filming is a guarantee of $100/day for up to 10 hours per day, per person. Any days over 8 hours incur overtime. Rehearsal pay is $50 guarantee for up to 5 hours.
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23 hours ago, Jade Bahr said:

Interesting watch:

 

 

Myth 3: Not saying the British Inquiry Report of 1912 was false but what on earth should've they said otherwise? Of course we locked up people below deck? LOL

 

Myth 4: Officer Murdoch. Well that's another story and maybe Cameron could have treaten that character differently BUT he apoligized by his family and in the end of the day it's not a documentary it's a hollywood movie. Despite from that personally I never had the feeling while watching the movie that Murdoch is a bad guy.

It wasn't much they could say. The gates may have been for some other purpose but they used them in the way they did. 

 

I saw Murdoch as someone that didn't realize what was happening and just did what he thought was the right thing to do. Isn't he the one that snaps out of it eventually and then starts to help out more? It is few people that can keep their cool like Rose and Jack did in a situation like that. 🙃 Or do everything right.

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10 hours ago, Sugarwater said:

 

So, I'm going to start by telling about some of my personal history. My grandfather was one of the native children that were forced to leave their homes and attend US run boarding schools where they were abused and forcibly stripped of their language and culture. Because of this, a lot of language and culture has been lost to me, and I have been striving and working for many, many years to reclaim my heritage and culture. Living in the capitol of Cherokee Nation and working for Cherokee Nation has helped this quest tremendously. I have even been learning how to speak and write Cherokee for the past several years. It's a hard language to learn and there aren't many people to speak it with. 

 

As I mentioned in a previous post, when I started out on my PhD journey, it was due to a love of psychology as well as a program called American Indians into Psychology (AIIP).  This program helped PhD candidates such as myself, who are Native American, to be able to become psychologists and bring back our training and services to our Native American communities. I now mainly work with Native American children and their families (all tribes, not just Cherokee), who have suffered trauma.

 

Several years ago, a group of us who were just starting out in the AIIP program, were invited to several tribal celebrations of different tribes throughout the state of Oklahoma. Each tribe performed a blessing ceremony on us which was amazing and something I will never forget. We got to attend dinners, dances, sweat lodges, bon fires, etc.. As someone who had a lot (not all thank goodness) of thier culture stripped away, this tour of the nations was a life changing experience. At the Osage Nation, I got to celebrate with them during their June celebrations and attend the dinner and dances. I've been back a few times since then as well.

 

Dances/powwows are not a part of Cherokee culture. They never have been. Cherokee Nation does hold an intertribal powwow in September, where other tribes from all over the US come and dance. Dancing, however, is a big part of Osage culture. Watching them dance is inspiring and I always get chills. I have learned a little bit about their dances, but not much. I know they have three locations in Oklahoma where they dance. The dances occur over 12 days in June. Each location takes turns hosting the celebration for four days. Dinner is always served before hand as a way to nourish the communitiy's body and soul and create fellowship. Each of the Osage dances have particular meaning, and women are.only allowed to dance in a couple of them. I'm not familiar with anymore than that.

 

I know this was a lot more information than you asked for and are probably interested in knowing, but I didn't want to just say, "I don't really know." 😁 

 

 

 

Thank you for sharing. ❤ So the dances goes on now or soon maybe? 🙃

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58 minutes ago, Mirella said:

I saw Murdoch as someone that didn't realize what was happening and just did what he thought was the right thing to do. Isn't he the one that snaps out of it eventually and then starts to help out more? It is few people that can keep their cool like Rose and Jack did in a situation like that. 🙃 Or do everything right.

It's more the fact that Jack and Rose are fictional characters while Officer William Murdoch is a real person and what I've learned he did the best that night trying to save as many passengers he could, filling as many life boats as possible and heroically went down with the ship. Now in the movie he's portrayed not only shooting a passenger and then committing suicide but accepting Cal Hockleys money for a seat in one of the lifeboats.

 

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William Murdoch – the Titanic’s Scottish scapegoat

Was the Scottish officer in charge when the Titanic hit an iceberg a murdering, incompetent coward who shot himself or a brave man doing his duty? Or was he a brave man who went down with his ship, saving the lives of others?

 

First-Officer-Murdoch_rgbuse.jpg

 

Cameron’s movie, at least the eighth to tell the story of the Titanic, was a massive success, becoming the highest-grossing movie of all time.

 

For many of the millions of people who saw the movie, Cameron’s is the only version of the story they know. And so, for the sake of filling Hollywood’s coffers, the final minutes of one of Scotland’s bravest men have been transformed into a ghastly soap opera. The world now remembers Murdoch as the cowardly man who shot two passengers and then turned his gun on himself. And who cares if the story is true when it makes such great cinema?

 

William McMaster Murdoch was born in Dalbeattie, Dumfries and Galloway, in 1873 to a seafaring family. Both his father and his grandfather were sea captains, and several of his uncles were sailors too. William continued the family tradition by going to sea aged 13 and serving aboard various sailing ships during the final years of the ‘age of sail’, travelling as far afield as Chile and China.

 

He joined the White Star Line in 1900, rising from Second Officer to First Officer, and serving on board a variety of ships, including three of the so-called ‘big four’: Celtic, Cedric and Adriatic. He earned a reputation for having a cool head in a crisis while serving on the White Star Line’s Arabic in 1903, when he narrowly avoided a collision by seizing the helm and steering the ship to safety. Murdoch had a less salubrious career on board the White Star Line’s next megaship, the Olympic, which he joined in May 1911.

 

BPG875.jpg

Under the command of Captain Smith, the ship first collided with a naval vessel on the Solent, causing extensive damage to both ships, then hit a wreck off New York, requiring her to be fi tted with a new propeller, and then nearly ran aground off Belfast. It was a hint of much worse things to come.

 

The story of the Titanic is well known. Built as the biggest and most luxurious liner the world had ever seen, she was intended to outshine the new ships launched by the White Star Line’s main rival, Cunard.

 

Her waterproof bulkheads were thought to make her unsinkable, and she was therefore only fitted with lifeboats for 1,176 people – half her complement of 2,223 passengers and crew.

 

Murdoch was 39 years old when the Titanic was commissioned in 1912, with 16 years of service behind him. He was a logical choice for Chief Offi cer, with his old friend Charles Lightoller as First Officer. He must have been disappointed, therefore, when Captain Smith brought along his second-in-command from Olympic, Henry Wilde, as Chief Officer, and Murdoch was demoted to First Officer, with a corresponding reshuffle in the lower ranks.

 

Murdoch was the offi cer in charge when the Titanic struck an iceberg. There are varying accounts of his actions, but most agree that he did everything possible to avoid collision.

 

Once the order was given to abandon ship, Murdoch took charge of the starboard deck and was responsible for filling eight lifeboats, saving 330 lives.

 

According to Lightoller, he remained on deck right until the last lifeboat was floated off by a wave. Lightoller told the British inquiry: ‘Mr Murdoch I saw at the actual moment that I went under water. He was then working at the forward fall on the starboard side forward; that is the fall to connect to the collapsible boat.’

 

As the last lifeboats were launched, however, several witnesses report hearing gunshots, and some claim to have seen an offi cer shoot two men who were trying to rush the boats and then shoot himself – although none of the firsthand accounts mention Murdoch by name.

 

Shots were fired to control the crowd, but most witnesses say these were fired into the water or over people’s head. It’s easy to see how, in the confusion, this might be misconstrued as shooting at people. Witness accounts are notoriously unreliable, and there is nothing in Murdoch’s previous history to suggest he would either shoot at people or shoot himself.

 

He had a cool head and, with his beloved wife Ada waiting for him at home, everything to live for. Certainly Lord Mersey, who oversaw the British Inquiry, thought so. ‘The evidence satisfies me that the officers did their work very well and without any thought of themselves,’ he said. ‘Captain Smith, the Master, Mr Wilde the chief officer, Mr Murdoch, the first officer, and Mr Moody, the sixth officer, all went down with the ship while performing their duties.’

 

titanic-new-york-american-coverageuse.jp

 

The story was too sensational to be ignored by the papers, however, and it was used to feed the public desire for a scapegoat. Eighty five years later, the story proved irresistible to Cameron too, and he used it to add an extra twist to his story.

 

Needless to say, the people of Dalbeattie were outraged when the movie was released, and Cameron was eventually forced to issue an apology in the form of a £5,000 donation to the Murdoch Memorial Prize Fund.

 

Only time will tell whether Murdoch’s reputation will recover, but it is worth remembering the words of the man he knew best on the Titanic.

 

‘I was practically the last man, and certainly the last officer, to see Mr Murdoch,’ Lightoller told his widow. ‘He was endeavouring to launch the starboard forward collapsible boat. Other reports as to the ending are absolutely false. Mr Murdoch died like a man, doing his duty.’

 

Source

 

Quote

'Titanic' 20-years later: James Cameron would have changed these things in the movie

 

James Cameron said there is one "Titanic" character he didn't think all the way through when creating the giant film that ruled the box office 20 years ago.

 

Cameron, featured on the National Geographic television special "Titanic: 20 years later with James Cameron" that aired Nov. 26, 2017, said he knows so much more about the ship and its demise. Since the film's debut in 1997, he's gone underwater to research it dozens of times.

 

He's also connected to family members of the victims and survivors of the ship's sinking April 14, 1912.

 

Cameron said in the television special most of the families believe he portrayed their ancestors accurately. But the family of William McMaster Murdoch disagrees. No one from Murdoch's family as featured on the show, but Cameron said they were unhappy with the depiction of the lieutenant's suicide. The film shows Murdoch shooting a passenger and then himself.

 

While the film is based on eyewitness evidence of a shooting/suicide by an officer during the launching of a lifeboat, there has not been evidence pointing to Murdoch, nor evidence disproving the incident.

 

Cameron said he wished he had been more sensitive to the family that would have watched the film, and he was thinking about the specific scene more as a storyteller and less as an historian. (...)

 

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24 minutes ago, Jade Bahr said:

It's more the fact that Jack and Rose are fictional characters while Officer William Murdoch is a real person and what I've learned he did the best that night trying to save as many passengers he possibly could, filling as many life boats as possible and heroically went down with the ship. Now in the movie he's portrayed not only shooting a passenger and then committing suicide but accepting Cal Hockleys money for a seat in one of the lifeboats.

 

 

 

Didn't Cameron at one point say that he should have done this particular character fictional? (More storytelling as you point out). I never paid that much focus on Murdoch watching Titanic but You can understand that it did upset people with facts and rumors being beside each other like that. In my opinion, they don't portray him as cool and collected saving at lot of lives in Titanic. 

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Thanks Sugarwater for sharing your own family experience in being stripped and now reclaiming your heritage (I continue to learn something new each time) and the KOTFLM news, ox for the pics and news and Jade for Titanic info and the article about William Murdoch.  It wasn't until years later when I looked more into his background and what he actually did I better understood criticism of the film changing things here and there for dramatic purposes.

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Jade

 

Tks for video & I can well understand his family’s concern about the behavior attributed to him  in film by Cameron 

 

 

Sugarwater

 

Tks for reply to my question , as well as , all the additional info & pix you shared with us = all are much appreciated :) 

 

 

 

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On 6/1/2021 at 6:11 AM, Mirella said:

@Jade Bahr

 

When the topic was taking off your clothes in front of Leo.😂 I love Youtube.

 

I have never heard of this movie. Does anyone know if it is good or bad? Fairly good review I think. 

I finally watched the movie last night. I didn't know it's a Garry Marshall movie so when it started I was like oh it's a Pretty Woman movie LOL It's actually nothing like Pretty Woman despite from some faces Marshall was always working with (like Hector Elizondo and Jane Morris). I liked the dynamic between Pacino and Pfeiffer.

 

He is so INTO her it was really... well I liked it. A lot :p

 

The way he looks at her...

tumblr_mj32sz8Lzx1r60h6bo1_r1_250.gifv tumblr_mj32sz8Lzx1r60h6bo3_250.gifv

tumblr_mj32sz8Lzx1r60h6bo2_250.gifv tumblr_mj32sz8Lzx1r60h6bo4_250.gifv

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... protects her...

88b207dc34508d2be176b335efa1cfe586c2b4b7

56562df3993475b407619b335559eb152791b21c

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... speaks to her...

tumblr_oi1bjaHJde1v4a8wfo2_1280.png

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... and kisses her :baronfaint:

d7a46b282b0e083ee6e620984ae6df3387212daa

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Another heart melting scene I just have to mention is the one where Johnny is spooning with a prostitute (instead of doing other stuff lol) just because he's so freaking lonely ...

f40365a5b706873ff0d9039518a90fd7e453cfa3 01f00e5a1afa1ee80eaae8229bb447222efdabbe

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So how can I make this post at least a little Leo related? Maybe this counts lol (the Shakespeare/Romeo & Juliet reference is coming up 3 or 4 times)

94be14adfbc2272dcdf9f01d2cd150b8be42957a

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In short: Beautiful movie about love :PinkCouture2:

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2 hours ago, Jade Bahr said:

I finally watched the movie last night. I didn't know it's a Garry Marshall movie so when it started I was like oh it's a Pretty Woman movie LOL It's actually nothing like Pretty Woman despite from some faces Marshall was always working with (like Hector Elizondo and Jane Morris). I liked the dynamic between Pacino and Pfeiffer.

 

He is so INTO her it was really... well I liked it. A lot :p

 

The way he looks at her...

tumblr_mj32sz8Lzx1r60h6bo1_r1_250.gifv tumblr_mj32sz8Lzx1r60h6bo3_250.gifv

tumblr_mj32sz8Lzx1r60h6bo2_250.gifv tumblr_mj32sz8Lzx1r60h6bo4_250.gifv

Source

 

... protects her...

88b207dc34508d2be176b335efa1cfe586c2b4b7

56562df3993475b407619b335559eb152791b21c

Source

 

... speaks to her...

tumblr_oi1bjaHJde1v4a8wfo2_1280.png

tumblr_oi1bjaHJde1v4a8wfo1_1280.png

Source

 

... and kisses her :baronfaint:

d7a46b282b0e083ee6e620984ae6df3387212daa

Source

 

Another heart-melting scene I just have to mention is the one where Johnny is spooning with a prostitute (instead of doing other stuff lol) just because he's so freaking lonely ...

f40365a5b706873ff0d9039518a90fd7e453cfa3 01f00e5a1afa1ee80eaae8229bb447222efdabbe

Source

 

So how can I make this post at least a little Leo-related? Maybe this counts lol (the Shakespeare/Romeo & Juliet reference is coming up 3 or 4 times)

94be14adfbc2272dcdf9f01d2cd150b8be42957a

Source

 

In short: Beautiful movie about love :PinkCouture2:

I loved this movie. ❤ Just for the simple story of feeling alone or scared and in love. Pacino does the charming adoring thing well. 🙃 Pfeiffer is one of my favorite actors. I recommend watching it.  

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4 hours ago, Sugarwater said:

The Oilman’s Daughter is available all this week, but then it’s booked everyday until the end of July. I wonder if Leo will pop up somewhere other than Oklahoma this week.

Camila's BD is on June the 16th, so maybe he flies to LA to do a pap walk with her or he flies her out to OK to do the same.  

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